About Research Team

Maryam Khan

Sarah Shah
Momin Rahman
Michael Woodford

Nuha Dwaikat-Shaer

Fatima

Emily

Maryam Khan

Maryam Khan (she/her/they/them) is a Social Work professor at Wilfrid Laurier University. Prior to Laurier, Maryam was pursuing doctoral studies in social work at York University, Toronto, Ontario. Maryam’s doctoral research critically examined the resistance strategies and agency of LBTQ Muslim women living out their intersectional identities (race, ethnicity religiosity, spirituality, sexuality, gender identity and expression) in the Global North amongst the hegemonic norms existing in both normative Muslim and LGBTQ communities.

Sarah Shah

Sarah Shah (they/them) is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Institute of Islamic Studies, The University of Toronto. Their research includes analyses of religion as it pertains to gender and family relations, immigration and racialization, and mental health. Sarah is also an assistant professor at the department of sociology, UTM, a research consultant for Canadian Muslim community organizations, a core organizer for Salaam Canada, and a leader at the El Tawhid Jumma Circle Toronto Unity Mosque. 

Momin Rahman

Momin Rahman (he/him) is a Professor of Sociology at Trent University in Canada. His current research is on the conflicts between LGBT identities and Muslim cultures, and the experiences of LGBT Muslims, including a funded research project on LGBT Muslims in Canada.  He has presented this work at international academic conferences and at private policy meetings such as the United Nations Human Rights Council.  He has published over 30 chapters and articles and 4 books: The Oxford Handbook of Global LGBT and Sexual Diversity Politics (2020, co-edited with Michael Bosia and Sandra McEvoy, Oxford University Press), Homosexualities, Muslim Cultures and Modernity, (2014, Palgrave Macmillan), Gender and Sexuality (2010, with Stevi Jackson, Polity) and Sexuality and Democracy (2000, Edinburgh University Press).

Michael Woodford

Michael (he/him) is a professor of social work at Wilfrid Laurier University. His research addresses the inclusion/exclusion and wellbeing of diverse LGBTQ2S+ individuals. Much of his work examines intersections between cisgenderist/heterosexist discrimination, including everyday microaggressions, resilience, and mental health outcomes among LGBTQ2S+ university students. He is currently leading the Thriving on Campus study, an Ontario-wide LGBTQ2S+ campus climate study.

Nuha Dwaikat-Shaer

Nuha Dwaikat-Shaer (she/her) is a faculty member at Wilfrid Laurier University, Faculty of Social Work. Nuha’s broad research agenda focuses on access to social services for racial minorities in settler colonial contexts, rooted in a commitment to human rights and social justice. Her interdisciplinary approach lies at the intersection of international development studies, settler colonialism, human rights and political geography. Her research studies the politics of securitization, human rights and community resiliency despite embedded and structural inequalities in settler colonial contexts, as well as its impact on human security. Nuha’s research goes beyond the notion of victimization by focusing on people’s agency and promoting resiliency to challenge structural oppression and inequalities.

Fatima

Fatima (they/she) is a research assistant with this study. They are a first generation Pakistani Muslim immigrant (arrivant-settler) and currently a student at University of Guelph studying Philosophy. They are a co-facilitator for a workshop dedicated to LGBT Muslims at OK2BME’s annual GSA Conference, aiming to provide an understanding of the various circumstances LGBT Muslims kids may face and resources to help teachers & social workers to better support them. Fatima has also been involved with projects such as Kapit Bisig Laban COVID, a nationwide effort dedicated to providing food, PPE, and other resources to migrant workers in Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic. They are anti-capitalist, anti-imperialist, and focus heavily on disabled women’s experiences.

Emily

Emily (she/her) is a Research Assistant with this study. She is a recent graduate of the Community Psychology Masters program at Wilfrid Laurier University. Her research explored the well-being and community experiences of 2SLGBTQ+ newcomers and the strategies these individuals use to promote and maintain their well-being. Emily was also the previous coordinator for the Thriving on Campus study which focused on the campus experiences of 2SLGBTQ+ university students throughout Ontario. As a queer woman, Emily is passionate about public education and knowledge translation as a way of promoting safe and inclusive environments for all 2SLGBTQ+ individuals.

Past Research Team Members

Anum Urooj-Sage

Ayesha Masud

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Zainab

Anum Urooj-Sage

Anum Urooj-Sage (she/her) is a Research Assistant with this study. She is a first-generation immigrant (arrivant-settler) from Pakistan & raised in the United Arab Emirates. She is a new Master of Social Work graduate from Wilfrid Laurier University, and also has a background in psychology and gerontology. Anum has over six years of combined experience working with diverse populations, including with survivors of gender-based violence, youth with disabilities, and newcomers to Canada. 

Ayesha Masud

Ayesha Masud (she/her) is a Masters of Psychotherapy student at Wilfrid Laurier University. She recently graduated from the University of Waterloo with a Health Studies degree. She was a previous coordinator of the undergraduate service RAISE (Racial Advocacy for Inclusion, Solidarity, and Equity) at UWaterloo, and has worked in various equity spaces at the institutional level. As a queer Muslim, Ayesha is currently working to gain knowledge and build community at the intersection of religion, race, sexuality and other overlapping identity markers.

Zainab

Zainab (they/her) is a researcher and career advisor at the University of Waterloo. Their academic research focuses on gratitude norms, collective action, immigration and silencing. In previous roles, Zainab has coordinated a racial advocacy service, researched with a social innovation lab and provided peer support to racialized 2SLGBTQ+ students. They are a passionate advocate for climate justice, racial justice and rights of migrant workers.

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